Word to Life — Sunday Scripture readings, April 9, 2017

April 9, Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion

      Cycle A. Readings:

      Gospel at the Procession With Palms:
Matthew 21:1-11

      1) Isaiah 50:4-7

      Psalm 22:8-9, 17-20, 23-24

      2) Philippians 2:6-11

      Gospel: Matthew 26:14-27:66

 

By Deacon Mike Ellerbrock
Catholic News Service

What is the difference between Peter and Judas, both of whom denied Jesus? One becomes the rock upon which the church is founded, our first pope and a great saint. The other becomes synonymous with personal betrayal by a kiss and famous as history’s ultimate traitor.

When someone is mad at me, I don’t like it. Why? Truth be told: I don’t like the guilt of being “guilty” … busted, exposed, vulnerable, sinful.

For me to practice unconditional love, I must delve deeper for the grace and courage to empty my conscience of ego, to get to “It’s not about me!”

Simon Peter, Jesus’ close friend and confidant, boldly declares to Jesus that “though all may have their faith in you shaken, mine will never be” and, “even though I should have to die with you, I will not deny you.” Yet, Peter cowers three times when confronted by two girls and some bystanders: “I do not know the man.” The cock crows, signaling his betrayal.

Among the Twelve, Judas apparently held some rank, as he was appointed treasurer by Jesus.

After betraying Jesus, both Judas and Peter deeply regret their actions. Peter “weeps bitterly.”

“Flinging the money into the temple,” Judas attempts to return the “blood” bribe to the chief priests and elders and then commits suicide. What’s the difference?

In our own relationships today, when we speak those sacred words, “I am sorry,” to someone we have hurt, what is our motivation?

Judas is sorry because he knows that he is in trouble with God. The consequences are terrifying.

Peter is sorry because he knows he has hurt his dear friend’s feelings. The regret is genuine.

The difference is that Peter trusted in Jesus’ forgiveness, while Judas lost all hope and fell to despair.

When we gossip or bad mouth others, do we owe them a private or public apology, and likewise when we have been hurt? Private apologies are often easier and less embarrassing, but do not fully repair the harm done.

True reconciliation requires “kenosis” or “emptying” ourselves, “taking the form of a slave” to “humble” ourselves for the sake of others, no matter how painful.

QUESTIONS:

How well do we know ourselves? Do we truly listen to the face in the mirror?

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