New Connecticut bishop plans to ‘repurpose’ residence

Bishop Frank J. Caggiano of Bridgeport, Connecticut. (CNS photo/Greg Shemitz)

Bishop Frank J. Caggiano of Bridgeport, Connecticut. (CNS photo/Greg Shemitz)

When he was installed as head of the Diocese of Bridgeport, Connecticut, just a year ago, and Bishop Frank J. Caggiano urged his new flock to be builders of spiritual bridges. He used a famous image of his hometown — the Brooklyn Bridge — to describe how, like a physical bridge, a “spiritual bridge” pulls communities together draws Catholics closer to God, the Gospels and one another as members of the body of Christ.

“On my first day of ministry in your midst, I ask you to join with me hand in hand, heart to heart, to become builders of spiritual bridges with the help and grace of the Lord and his Holy Spirit,” he said in his homily during his installation Mass last September.

It’s been a busy first year for the bishop, and he recently made some headlines delivering his first “state of the diocese” address.  Among other things he announced plans to “repurpose” the nearly 9,000-square- foot bishop’s residence, as National Catholic Reporter put it, and use it once again for the diocesan seminary.

There are details to work out, but his announcement seems in keeping with Pope Francis’ spirit of simplicity and his example of poverty and humility.

The Fairfield County Catholic, Bridgeport’s diocesan newspaper, reported that in his Sept. 9 address at All Saints School auditorium in Norwalk, Bishop Caggiano outlined the pastoral, administrative and financial challenges facing the diocese, and said he expects to make a “state of the diocese” address a yearly event under his tenure.

His 50-minute talk was well received, the paper said, by the audience of 500 lay leaders, pastors and synod delegates. He was interrupted several times by applause and received a standing ovation at the end of his remarks. The diocese’s 350 synod delegates will soon begin their work “to help plan the future of the Catholic Church in Fairfield County.”

%d bloggers like this: