Cardinal to young Catholics: Cherish, nurture gift of faith

By Sarah Hinds

Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)

Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington. (CNS/Bob Roller)

WASHINGTON — It’s not every day that a 21-year-old summer intern has the opportunity to interview one of the most prominent members of the Catholic hierarchy in America, but recently I was blessed to conduct a one-on-one interview with Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington.

“You have received a wonderful gift — the gift of faith,” the cardinal told me during the interview in his Washington office. “It’s a precious gift, but it needs to be nurtured.”

As a recent convert to Catholicism and senior in college, I wanted to know what the cardinal had to say to young Catholics. In the 20 minutes I spent with him, he offered a wealth of spiritual insight and advice about how we are to nurture this gift of faith that we Catholics have been given — advice that is certainly not, however, restricted to 20-somethings.

Increasingly, young people face a culture that is extremely hostile to faith, purity and virtue, especially on college campuses. I asked Cardinal Wuerl what advice he would give to young people who desire to stay close to God in college and to strive for purity and virtue in the midst of secular culture.

“This is one of the reasons why the church keeps saying to us, ‘Stay close to the sacraments. Get to Mass. Get to confession.’ Because for 2,000 years the church has been proclaiming Jesus Christ and his Gospel and we know it’s not easy to live the way Jesus asks us in a secular world, and this is a very secular environment,” he said.

“My first word to anybody today trying to stay close to Christ is to get to Mass and stay close to him in prayer.”

Cardinal Wuerl, the chancellor of The Catholic University of America, said college is a great time for young people to really renew and explore their faith, and to become confident in its truth: “Be confident in that truth, and do everything you can not only to stand in that truth but to share it.”

Finding a Catholic community on campus is also helpful, he said, recounting his interactions with Catholic groups on college campuses in the Washington Archdiocese. “I remember once talking to young people at a college and we were talking about the virtuous life, and they said once you get to know a couple of other people on campus that share the same vision, life becomes so much better,” he said.

Ordained in 1966, Cardinal Wuerl said that his call to the priesthood was deeply rooted in his upbringing in Pittsburgh.

“I grew up in a neighborhood that was very Catholic. We attended Catholic elementary school; we had a great parish. The priests of the parish were always very supportive of all the young people but I often thought as I was growing up, wouldn’t it be nice to try to do what they were doing? That really planted the seed,” he said.

“It was really rooted in the experience of the parish, of the parish priests, and of course at home because my mother and father were good, loving, practicing Catholics who shared their faith with us.”

To young people discerning a call to the priesthood or religious life, Cardinal Wuerl said, “You have to try it. I can’t say whether you have a vocation to the priesthood or the religious life, I can’t tell you whether or not God’s calling you and you can’t say right now with certitude, ‘This is what God wants me to do.’ But you can try it. That’s the only way you’ll ever know if God is asking you to be a priest or religious.”

“The best that could happen to you is you could find that it’s the right thing for you. The worst thing that could happen is you’ll decide this isn’t for you. But you’ll never know either if you don’t try it.”

Cardinal Wuerl emphasized the importance of prayer, especially when one is discerning a vocation: “When you’re discerning, remember to talk to Jesus. You need to find some time every day, quietly, it doesn’t have to be huge expanses of time, but you want to find some bit of time every day to talk to the Lord and just say, ‘Lord be with me, let me know what it is you’re saying to me.’ That’s very important.”

In 2012, Cardinal Wuerl helped direct the 2012 Vatican Synod of Bishops on the New Evangelization for the Transmission of the Christian Faith. I asked him how we can evangelize to those who have fallen away from the Catholic Church.

“The most important thing we can do is live our faith,” he said. “Pope Francis talks about how everyone who has been baptized is a missionary disciple. What is a missionary disciple? It’s a person who shares the faith. Probably the most impactful way we can do that is when people see the way we live. If we can live in joy, if we can live in God’s love, we can live a virtuous life, and when people see that, it’s already an invitation to them.”

“And secondly, actively invite people to experience the joy (of your faith),” he continued. “An evangelist is a person who loves the faith, is confident in its truth, and who is prepared to share it.”

To young Catholic men and women in college and recent graduates, Cardinal Wuerl had this to say: “You received a wonderful gift — the gift of faith. You have to realize that faith is the door that opens to a relationship with God. The Church brings us what she has always brought us, an encounter with Jesus Christ, and an opportunity to live that in faith.”

“Faith is a precious gift,” he said. “Cherish it. Nurture it. And in that faith you will find a very happy, fulfilled life.”

From martyrs to moviestars: getting a Vatican stamp of ‘approval’

joan of arcVATICAN CITY — Most of the stamps the Vatican issues each year celebrate saints, popes or the birth or death of some late great European painter or composer.

Now and then there is a commemorative stamp marking a United Nations or Europe-wide year dedicated to themes such as water, books, forests and even the postal van! postal van

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rarely has the Vatican stamp and coin office issued what it did this year: celebrating the 125th anniversary of the birth of Charlie Chaplin, “whose work impacted more than fifty years of the history of film,” the office said.

Chaplin 2014 minifoglio (2)

Some of the only other recent stamps celebrating “modern” and more secular artists have included:

  • a 2004 aerogram marking the anniversary of the birth of the 20th century Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dali’
  • stamps in 2003 celebrating the 19th century post-Impressionist painters Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin
  • and a series in 2010 marking the birth of Anton Chekhov and death of Leo Tolstoy — two 19th century Russian writers

tolstoy chekov

aids

Sometimes the Vatican uses its collectors’ appeal for promoting important causes and raising funds for different initiatives, like when all proceeds from the sale of a 2004 stamp dedicated to children with AIDS were donated in the pope’s name to projects helping AIDS orphans.

 

Court grants college temporary relief from HHS mandate

The U.S. Supreme Court late Thursday afternoon issued an unsigned opinion granting Christian-run Wheaton College in Illinois temporary relief from complying with the Department of Health and Human Services’ federal contraceptive mandate that is part of the Affordable Care Act. The order in Wheaton College v. Burwell came three days after the court issued its Hobby Lobby decision.

(CNS file photo)

(CNS file photo)

The court said the college, located west of Chicago, does not have to fill out the self-certification form — known as EBSA Form 700 — directing a third party, usually the manager of an employer’s health plan, to provide the contested coverage. The college can send a letter to the government, the court said.

If the applicant informs the HHS secretary “in writing that it is a nonprofit organization that holds itself out as religious and has religious objections to providing coverage for contraceptive services, the respondents are enjoined from enforcement against the applicant the challenged provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and related regulations pending final disposition of appellate review.”

The EBSA form is an accommodation the Obama administration put in place for religious employers who are not exempt from the HHS mandate. But Wheaton College and many other religious employers, including Catholic institutions, that have sued over the mandate argue that even filling out the form to direct a third party to take care of the coverage makes them complicit in providing coverage they find objectionable.

“The circuit courts have divided on whether to enjoin the requirement that religious nonprofit organizations use EBSA Form 700,” the Supreme Court said in its Thursday order. “Nothing in this interim order affects the ability of the applicant’s employees and students to ontain, without cost, the full range of FDA approved contraceptives.” The order also said it “should not be construed as an expression of the court’s views on the merits” of the case.

The order is similar to an injunction granted earlier this year to the Little Sisters of the Poor. On Jan. 24 the high court issued a three-sentence order affirming — for the time being — an injunction blocking enforcement of the mandate against the religious order, which runs housing for the elderly poor. The Jan. 24 order affirmed Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s Dec. 31 order.

But with regard to the order in Wheaton College v. Burwell, Sotomayor — joined by Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan — issued a sharply worded dissent. She said this injunction “risks depriving hundreds of Wheaton’s employees and students of their legal entitlement to contraceptive coverage. … I do not doubt Wheaton genuinely believes that signing the self-certification form is contrary to its religious beliefs. But thinking one’s religious beliefs are substantially burdened — no matter how sincere or genuine that belief may be — does not make it so.”

Philip Ryken, president of Wheaton College, called the court’s order “a wise decision.”

“On the eve of Independence Day, we are grateful to God that the Supreme Court has made a wise decision in protecting our religious liberty — at least until we have an opportunity to make our full case in court,” he said in a statement. “We continue to believe that a college community that affirms the sanctity of human life from conception to the grave should not be coerced by the government into facilitating the provision of abortion-inducing drugs.”

In other court action on challenges to the mandate, the Catholic Benefits Association was granted a temporary restraining order against enforcement for 156 Catholic employers and more than 1,090 parishes that joined the association after June 4.

The association was formed last October with 450 Catholic employer members and 2,000 parish members. Among the members are eight archdioceses, 15 dioceses, religious orders, local Catholic Charities affiliates, colleges, nursing homes, cemeteries, retreat centers and medical facilities. It filed a class-action lawsuit in March against the mandate on religious freedom grounds, and on June 4 a federal district court in Oklahoma issued an injunction in favor of the group.

After June 4 more employers and parishes joined the association, so a second lawsuit was filed July 1 seeking a temporary restraining order for them. After an emergency hearing, it was granted by the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma.

 

 

Official prayer, logo for World Youth Day 2016

VATICAN CITY — The Vatican and the Archdiocese of Krakow — host of WYD 2016 — unveiled today the official logo and prayer for the international youth gathering that’s set for July 26-31, two years from now.

logo-400

Both the prayer and the logo focus on Divine Mercy and the theme chosen by Pope Francis from the Gospel of St. Matthew: “Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy.”

Here’s a handy breakdown of the logo, describing what it means:

wyd symbols mean

Graphic distributed on the Facebook page of the official World Youth Day website: http://www.krakow2016.com/en/

The Archdiocese of Krakow is the former see of St. John Paul II and is home to the Divine Mercy sanctuary. St. John Paul had a great devotion to the Divine Mercy, the recognition of God’s mercy as demonstrated in his sending his son to die for the sins of humanity.

Here’s the official prayer (in English and Spanish), which begins with a line from the homily St. John Paul II delivered at the dedication of the Shrine of Divine Mercy in Krakow in 2002.

 

Prayer for World Youth Day 2016 in Krakow

“‘God, merciful father,
in your son, Jesus Christ, you have revealed your love
and poured it out upon us in the Holy Spirit, the comforter,
we entrust to you today the destiny of the world and of every man and woman.’

We entrust to you in a special way
young people of every language, people and nation:
guide and protect them as they walk the complex paths of the world today
and give them the grace to reap abundant fruits
from their experience of the Krakow World Youth Day.

Heavenly Father,
grant that we may bear witness to your mercy.
Teach us how to convey the faith to those in doubt,
hope to those who are discouraged,
love to those who feel indifferent,
forgiveness to those who have done wrong
and joy to those who are unhappy.
Allow the spark of merciful love that you have en-kindled within us
become a fire that can transform hearts and renew the face of the earth.

Mary, Mother of Mercy, pray for us.

St. John Paul II, pray for us.”

 

Oracion para la Jornada Mundial de la Juventud de Cracovia 2016

“’Dios, Padre misericordioso,
Que has revelado tu amor en tu hijo, Jesucristo
y lo has derramado sobre nosotros en el Espíritu Santo, consolador,
te encomendamos hoy el destino del mundo y de todo hombre.’
Te encomendamos en modo particular
los jóvenes de toda lengua, pueblo y nación.
Guíales y protégeles en los complejos caminos de hoy
y dales la gracia de poder cosechar abundantes frutos
de la experiencia de la Jornada Mundial de la Juventud de Cracovia.

Padre celestial,
haznos testigos de tu misericordia.
Enséñanos a llevar la fe a los que dudan,
la esperanza a los desanimados,
el amor a los indiferentes,
el perdón a quien ha obrado el mal
y la alegría a los infelices.
Haz que la chispa del amor misericordioso
que has encendido dentro de nosotros
se convierta en un fuego que transforma los corazones
y renueva la faz de la tierra.

María, Madre de Misericordia, ruega por nosotros.
San Juan Pablo II, ruega por nosotros.”

 

 

Off the fence? World Cup puts pope on offense vs. his own defense

pope guard2

A Swiss guard looks on as Pope Francis arrives for a general audience in St. Peter’s Square June 11, 2014. (CNS photo by Paul Haring)

VATICAN CITY — Even though Pope Francis has repeatedly pledged to root for no one nation and Switzerland has historically held a stance of armed neutrality, those pacifist days may be over.

Pope Francis has reportedly declared, “It’s going to be war!” to his own defenders — the Swiss Guard — ahead of today’s World Cup match: Argentina vs. Switzerland.

The French news service, IMedia, reported that the pope was telling the very men who have vowed to sacrifice their own lives to protect him that it was war. All in jest obviously, and a fun indicator the pontiff will be keeping his eyes and ears open for the final score.

Pope Francis receives Argentine soccer jersey during general audience

Pope Francis grabs an Argentine soccer jersey during his June 25 general audience in St. Peter’s Square. (CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi, Reuters)

IMedia also reported that the guards invited the pope to come by their barracks tonight to watch the game on their big-screen setup, complete with artificial turf. The pope was said to have replied that “unfortunately” he couldn’t make it.

watching game swiss

Swiss guards and two children watching the World Cup in the guards’ barracks. Photo from the Guardia Svizzera Pontificia’s Facebook page.

 

The last time the two countries faced off at a World Cup game was in 1966 with Argentina taking away a 2-0 win.

 

The pope’s home nation is favored 2-to-1 to win this knockout round and make it on to the quarterfinals. So it’s unlikely we’ll see a disgruntled pontiff like the one below roaming the corridors of his residence:

swiss game

 

THIS JUST IN: Just heard from the Swiss Guard media point-man that while “no special party” has been organized for tonight, guards who are off-duty “will for sure enjoy a cold beer…”

 

 

Parsing the pope’s pallium

VATICAN CITY — When Pope Francis gave 24 new archbishops a pallium yesterday, it generated a bit of Twitter chatter … because of the pallium he was wearing.

Archbishop Leonard P. Blair of Hartford, Conn., and Pope Francis -- wearing matching palliums --greeted each other yesterday. (CNS/Paul Haring)

Archbishop Leonard P. Blair of Hartford, Conn., and Pope Francis — wearing matching palliums –greeted each other yesterday. (CNS/Paul Haring)

It was the same as the pallium he gave to the archbishops, although his already had the three jeweled pins pushed through three of the six crosses. The new archbishops are given a nice box with their pins in it.

At least in the Vatican’s official version, the length and width of the papal pallium has been subject to change and development over centuries, usually for very practical reasons having to do with historical changes in the other liturgical vestments over which it was worn.

Pope Benedict XVI initially used a pallium based on the most ancient existing depiction of the garment’s design — those seen in the 6th-century mosaics in the churches of Ravenna, Italy.

Pope Benedict XVI wearing the long pallium on Christmas Eve 2007. (CNS/pool)

Pope Benedict XVI wearing the long pallium on Christmas Eve 2007. (CNS/pool)

However, just a little more than three years into his papacy, Pope Benedict gave up the long, over-one-shoulder stole. Instead, he chose a pallium similar to that worn by archbishops — and by Pope John Paul II and dozens of popes before him — except that Pope Benedict’s had six red crosses instead of black crosses.

For the first 15 months of his pontificate — basically, until yesterday — Pope Francis wore a pallium of the same design as Pope Benedict used beginning with the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul in 2008.

Archbishop Maximian in a 6th-century mosaic in Ravenna. (Wiki Commons)

Archbishop Maximian in a 6th-century mosaic in Ravenna. (Wiki Commons)

When people on Twitter began commenting on Pope Francis’ choice and asking questions about it, I turned to the one man who could settle the question, Msgr. Guido Marini, the papal master of liturgical ceremonies. However, he didn’t make it clear whether the change was permanent.

He simply said the pope wore the pallium with black crosses “to not differentiate himself from the other metropolitans.”

(Not all archbishops receive the pallium. For example, nuncios and the archbishops who secretaries of Vatican congregations or presidents of pontifical councils do not have one. The pallium goes only to those who lead archdioceses that are main see of a metropolitan province. As the bishop of Rome, the pope is the archbishop and metropolitan of the province of Rome.)

Pope Francis wearing the pallium with red crosses at Mass in southern Italy June 21. (CNS/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis wearing the pallium with red crosses at Mass in southern Italy June 21. (CNS/Paul Haring)

Anglican-Roman Catholic bowling for unity?

VATICAN CITY — In the field of ecumenical dialogue, a key task always has been defining terms. Often, Christians have discovered, their beliefs are not that different, but the language they use is.

“Bowling” in the headline above does not involve an alley and 10 pins.

This is cricket. The game involves a ball and bat. And teams of 11. A field and a “pitch,” which is part of the field, not the act of throwing the ball.

As a group of priests and seminarians representing the Vatican and another representing the Church of England prepare to meet in September, it’s many of the rest of us who have to try to understand their terminology.

Father Tony Currer, the official in charge of Anglican-Roman Catholic relations at the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, is a “right-hand batsman.” He’ll be traveling back to England with three “right-arm fast bowlers” and seven other seminarians in the name of Christian unity.

The members of St. Peter's Cricket Club, aka the Vatican team.

The members of St. Peter’s Cricket Club, aka the Vatican team.

“A bowler is like a pitcher” in American baseball, he said. “I guess in baseball you would distinguish between left-handed and right-handed pitchers, right? Then some are specialists in bowling quickly or bowling with a spin.”

Before coming to Rome, Father Currer played in the Durham City League, which is an amateur league, though at a level “higher than a parish team” or something like that.

Sometimes Christians complain that ecumenical dialogue has been limited to a small group of experts. Cricket seems mostly limited to residents of the United Kingdom, Australia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, New Zealand, the West Indies and South Africa.

The Vatican-Church of England cricket match Sept. 19 at the Kent County Cricket Club will be preceded by ecumenical vespers Sept. 18 in the Anglican’s Canterbury Cathedral. Although initially planned strictly as a challenge, the two sides have now decided the match will be an occasion to raise money together for the Global Freedom Network, an interfaith effort against human trafficking supported both by Anglican Archbishop Justin Welby of Canterbury and Pope Francis.

I asked Father Currer if the joint fundraising effort was designed to mitigate the potentially negative ecumenical impact of an Anglican-Roman Catholic showdown.

“Normally I am in the business of finding agreement with the Anglicans, not beating them. That’s not the way forward,” he responded.

The Vatican XI — captained by Father Currer and including seminarians from India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka — has a total of four matches scheduled for their September “Tour of Light” in England. At a Vatican news conference yesterday, they announced one that’s creating quite a buzz: A Sept. 17 match against the team of the Royal Household of Windsor Castle, one of the residences of Queen Elizabeth II.

Father Currer isn’t sure yet if the match will take place on the castle grounds, but “it is not an unusual thing for a stately home to have a cricket site.”

No word yet on whether there will be royal spectators.

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