For collectors: Treasury of stamps, coins mark newest saints

Malta's two-stamp souvenir sheet honoring the two new saints.

Malta’s two-stamp souvenir sheet honoring the two new saints.

It’s not just Vatican City commemorating the canonizations of Sts. John XXIII and John Paul II through postage stamps and coins.

Post offices and treasuries around the world have taken steps to honor the Catholic Church’s newest saints.

At least 11 countries have joined the Vatican in creating philatelic delights for collectors. Among them are Poland (a joint issue with the Vatican), Benin, Chad, Republic of Congo, Croatia, Djibouti, Liechtenstein, Madagascar, Malawi, Malta and the Philippines.

The new issues come in both single-stamp and souvenir-sheet formats. In some cases the souvenir sheets include multiple colorful high-denomination, large-format stamps. While technically valid for postage, they are primarily issued in an attempt to attract collector money. Still, they are fun to collect.

One of two souvenir sheets from Philippines Post depicts St. John XXIII.

One of two souvenir sheets from Philippines Post depicts St. John XXIII.

Among the most interesting issues are the two 3-D, embossed gold foil stamps from Philippines Post each with a face value of 200 pesos, about $4.50. Printing quantities were 10,000 for the sheet featuring St. John Paul II and 5,000 of the St. John XIII sheet.

A new stamp from Croatia marks the canonization of St. John Paul II. Another of similar design depicts St. John XXIII.

A new stamp from Croatia marks the canonization of St. John Paul II. Another of similar design depicts St. John XXIII.

Croatia issued single stamps for both men and Liechtenstein’s single-stamp souvenir sheet commemorates only St. John Paul, who visited the small Alpine nation in 1985.

The Vatican and other nations have joined the commemoration parade by minting coins depicting the new stains. The Vatican’s issues include 50-euro gold and 15-euro silver coins.

The treasury of the government of Niue minted a rectangular triptych honoring St. John Paul.

The treasury of the government of Niue minted a rectangular triptych coin honoring St. John Paul.

Elsewhere, the Royal Canadian Mint has issued $25 gold and $10 silver coins honoring St. John Paul while Poland has minted a series of four coins depicting its Polish son. Perhaps the most unusual release comes from the treasury of the island nation of Niue with its colorful rectangular triptych coin. It has a face value of $20 New Zealand, about US$17.

If you’re so inclined, most of the stamps and coins can be ordered online direct from the appropriate post office or mint.

 

 

 

2 Responses

  1. The practice of issuing high-value stamps and coins is designed for one purpose only: raising revenue for the issuing authorities. If the authorities were interested primarily in publicizing the newly canonized popes, they would issue stamps and coins in denominations commonly used.

    Many years ago the United Nations Postal Administration (UNPA) decided to start milking the collectors for what they could. That’s when I quit collecting.

  2. In my humble opinion for the Church’s penance and retribution to mankind for Its’ indiscretions, putting it discreetly, should be to give back to each nation their stolen cultural artifacts and treasures that the Vatican holds, with interest.

    In addition, aiding these nation in setting up the infrastructure to house, to protect and to display for the world to view, boosting their economies and the self-esteem of the people of these nations.

    Them maybe the world could begin to believe that they are true followers of the teachings of Jesus Christ.

    “What is wrong with man-kind today is that we have forgotten that we belong to each other”
    Mother Teresa

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 730 other followers

%d bloggers like this: