“The Joy of the Gospel” Our top picks of quotable quotes

coverVATICAN CITY — Pope Francis’ just-released apostolic exhortation “Evangelii Gaudium” (The Joy of the Gospel) will be a must-read for all Catholics.

But at more than 220 pages, you’ll have to DVR Masterchef Junior and Downton Abbey for the next few nights.

To give you a sense of what’s inside, we’ve compiled some of the most striking quotes on a variety of themes from the text. (The numbers in parentheses refer to the document’s numbered sections where the quote can be found.)

Abortion

Among the vulnerable for whom the Church wishes to care with particular love and concern are unborn children, the most defenseless and innocent among us.

PREGNANT DEMONSTRATOR DISPLAYS WORD 'LIFE'

A pregnant pro-life demonstrator standing outside the Supreme Court in Washington in this Oct. 6, 2008 file photo. (CNS/Kevin Lamarque, Reuters)

Nowadays efforts are made to deny them their human dignity and to do with them whatever one pleases, taking their lives and passing laws preventing anyone from standing in the way of this. Frequently, as a way of ridiculing the Church’s effort to defend their lives, attempts are made to present her position as ideological, obscurantist and conservative. …

A human being is always sacred and inviolable, in any situation and at every stage of development. Human beings are ends in themselves and never a means of resolving other problems. (213).

Accompanying pregnant women

It is not “progressive” to try to resolve problems by eliminating a human life. On the other hand, it is also true that we have done little to adequately accompany women in very difficult situations, where abortion appears as a quick solution to their profound anguish, especially when the life developing within them is the result of rape or a situation of extreme poverty. Who can remain unmoved before such painful situations? (214)

Priestly ordination for men

The reservation of the priesthood to males, as a sign of Christ the Spouse who gives himself in the Eucharist, is not a question open to discussion, but it can prove especially divisive if sacramental power is too closely identified with power in general. It must be remembered that when we speak of sacramental power “we are in the realm of function, not that of dignity or holiness.” … Indeed, a woman, Mary, is more important than the bishops.(104).

Thou shalt not exclude

Man wakes up after sleeping in tent on street in downtown Los Angeles

A man waking up after sleeping in a tent on downtown Los Angeles’ Skid Row in early March 2013. There are 46.5 million people living in poverty in the United States. (CNS photo/Lucy Nicholson, Reuters)

Today we also have to say “thou shalt not” to an economy of exclusion and inequality. Such an economy kills. How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses two points? This is a case of exclusion. Can we continue to stand by when food is thrown away while people are starving? This is the case of inequality. Today everything comes under the laws of competition and the survival of the fittest, where the powerful feed upon the powerless. (53).

Trickle-down economics

In this context, some people continue to defend trickle-down theories which assume that economic growth, encouraged by a free market, will inevitably succeed in bringing about greater justice and inclusiveness in the world. This opinion, which has never been confirmed by the facts, expresses a crude and naive trust in the goodness of those wielding economic power and in the sacralized workings of the prevailing economic system. Meanwhile, the excluded are still waiting. (54).

Consumerism

We have created new idols. The worship of the ancient golden calf (cf. Ex 32:1-35) has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose. The worldwide crisis affecting finance and the economy lays bare their imbalances and, above all, their lack of real concern for human beings; man is reduced to one of his needs alone: consumption.(55).

Human trafficking

YOUNG GIRL HOLDS SIGN DURING ANTI-TRAFFICKING EVENT IN LOS ANGELES

A young girl taking part in the L.A. Freedom Walk — an anti-human trafficking event held in downtown Los Angeles. (CNS photo/CNS photo/Victor Aleman, Vida Nueva)

How I wish that all of us would hear God’s cry: “Where is your brother?” (Gen 4:9). Where is your brother or sister who is enslaved? Where is the brother and sister whom you are killing each day in clandestine warehouses, in rings of prostitution, in children used for begging, in exploiting undocumented labor. Let us not look the other way. There is greater complicity than we think. The issue involves everyone! This infamous network of crime is now well established in our cities, and many people have blood on their hands as a result of their comfortable and silent complicity. (211).

Political duty

People in every nation enhance the social dimension of their lives by acting as committed and responsible citizens, not as a mob swayed by the powers that be. Let us not forget that “responsible citizenship is a virtue, and participation in political life is a moral obligation.” (220).

Religious freedom

…does not entail privatizing religions in an attempt to reduce them to the quiet obscurity of the individual’s conscience or to relegate them to the enclosed precincts of churches, synagogues or mosques. This would represent, in effect, a new form of discrimination and authoritarianism.

The respect due to the agnostic or non-believing minority should not be arbitrarily imposed in a way that silences the convictions of the believing majority or ignores the wealth of religious traditions. In the long run, this would feed resentment rather than tolerance and peace. (255).

Inter-religious dialogue

What is not helpful is a diplomatic openness which says “yes” to everything in order to avoid problems, for this would be a way of deceiving others and denying them the good which we have been given to share generously with others. (251).

Islam

MEN PRAY AT ISLAMIC CENTER IN NEW YORK

Men praying during an open house at the Islamic Center of Long Island in Westbury, N.Y., in 2010. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)

I ask and I humbly entreat those countries to grant Christians freedom to worship and to practice their faith, in light of the freedom which followers of Islam enjoy in Western countries! Faced with disconcerting episodes of violent fundamentalism, our respect for true followers of Islam should lead us to avoid hateful generalizations, for authentic Islam and the proper reading of the Koran are opposed to every form of violence. (253).

Atheism

Today, our challenge is not so much atheism as the need to respond adequately to many people’s thirst for God, lest they try to satisfy it with alienating solutions or with a disembodied Jesus who demands nothing of us with regard to others. (89).

Service

Pope Francis washes the foot of a prisoner at Casal del Marmo youth prison in Rom

Pope Francis washing the foot of a prison inmate during the Holy Thursday Mass of the Lord’s Supper at Rome’s Casal del Marmo prison for minors March 28. (CNS photo/L’Osservatore Romano via Reuters) (March 28, 2013)

Let us try a little harder to take the first step and to become involved. Jesus washed the feet of his disciples. The Lord gets involved and he involves his own, as he kneels to wash their feet. He tells his disciples: “You will be blessed if you do this” (Jn 13:17) … Evangelizers thus take on the “smell of the sheep” and the sheep are willing to hear their voice. (24).

The papacy

Since I am called to put into practice what I ask of others, I too must think about a conversion of the papacy. It is my duty, as the Bishop of Rome, to be open to suggestions which can help make the exercise of my ministry more faithful to the meaning which Jesus Christ wished to give it and to the present needs of evangelization. (32).

Confession

I want to remind priests that the confessional must not be a torture chamber but rather an encounter with the Lord’s mercy which spurs us on to do our best. (44).

The priest & preparing homilies

If he does not take time to hear God’s word with an open heart, if he does not allow it to touch his life, to challenge him, to impel him, and if he does not devote time to pray with that word, then he will indeed be a false prophet, a fraud, a shallow impostor. But by acknowledging his poverty and desiring to grow in his commitment, he will always be able to abandon himself to Christ. (151).

Good homilies accentuate the positive

It is not so much concerned with pointing out what shouldn’t be done, but with suggesting what we can do better. In any case, if it does draw attention to something negative, it will also attempt to point to a positive and attractive value, lest it remain mired in complaints, laments, criticisms and reproaches. (159).

The church

2012 photo of Newtown pastor receiving mourners for funeral of young victim of school massacre

Msgr. Robert Weiss, pastor of St. Rose of Lima Church in Newtown, Conn., before a funeral Mass, in this Dec. 18, 2012, file photo. (CNS photo/Michelle McLoughlin, Reuters)

Our church doors should always be open, so that if someone, moved by the Spirit, comes there looking for God, he or she will not find a closed door. (47.)

The sacraments

Nor should the doors of the sacraments be closed for simply any reason. This is especially true of the sacrament which is itself “the door”: baptism.

The Eucharist, although it is the fullness of sacramental life, is not a prize for the perfect but a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak. These convictions have pastoral consequences that we are called to consider with prudence and boldness. Frequently, we act as arbiters of grace rather than its facilitators. But the Church is not a tollhouse; it is the house of the Father, where there is a place for everyone, with all their problems. (47).

Marriage

Marriage now tends to be viewed as a form of mere emotional satisfaction that can be constructed in any way or modified at will. But the indispensable contribution of marriage to society transcends the feelings and momentary needs of the couple. As the French bishops have taught, it is not born “of loving sentiment, ephemeral by definition, but from the depth of the obligation assumed by the spouses who accept to enter a total communion of life.” (66).

Sickness from isolation

COMBONI NUN WHO WORKS WITH REFUGEES WALKS WITH CHILD IN FRONT OF SHELTER IN TEL AVIV

Comboni Sister Azezet Kidane walks with a child in front of a shelter in Tel Aviv, Israel, Oct. 24, 2012. (CNS photo/Debbie Hill)

I prefer a Church which is bruised, hurting and dirty because it has been out on the streets, rather than a Church which is unhealthy from being confined and from clinging to its own security. I do not want a Church concerned with being at the center and then ends by being caught up in a web of obsessions and procedures. (49). … More than by fear of going astray, my hope is that we will be moved by the fear of remaining shut up within structures which give us a false sense of security, within rules which make us harsh judges, within habits which make us feel safe, while at our door people are starving. (49).

Biggest threat to church – ‘Tomb mentality’

The biggest threat of all gradually takes shape: “the gray pragmatism of the daily life of the Church, in which all appears to proceed normally, while in reality faith is wearing down and degenerating into small-mindedness.” A tomb psychology thus develops and slowly transforms Christians into mummies in a museum. Disillusioned with reality, with the Church and with themselves, they experience a constant temptation to cling to a faint melancholy, lacking in hope, which seizes the heart like “the most precious of the devil’s potions.” … For all this, I repeat: Let us not allow ourselves to be robbed of the joy of evangelization! (83).

Joy

An evangelizer must never look like someone who has just come back from a funeral!

CHURCH VOLUNTEERS SERVE AT-RISK YOUTHS IN LEON, MEXICO

Catholic youth outreach volunteers in a poor working-class neighborhood in Leon, Mexico, Feb. 10, 2012. (CNS photo/David Maung)

Let us recover and deepen our enthusiasm, that “delightful and comforting joy of evangelizing, even when it is in tears that we must sow.” (10).

Sourpusses have no confidence in Christ

One of the more serious temptations which stifles boldness and zeal is a defeatism which turns us into querulous and disillusioned pessimists, “sourpusses”. Nobody can go off to battle unless he is fully convinced of victory beforehand. If we start without confidence, we have already lost half the battle and we bury our talents. While painfully aware of our own frailties, we have to march on without giving in. (85).

Spiritual worldliness: Two extremes

In some people we see an ostentatious preoccupation for the liturgy, for doctrine and for the Church’s prestige, but without any concern that the Gospel have a real impact on God’s faithful people and the concrete needs of the present time. In this way, the life of the Church turns into a museum piece or something which is the property of a select few. (95).

In others, this spiritual worldliness lurks behind a fascination with social and political gain, or pride in their ability to manage practical affairs, or an obsession with programs of self-help and self-realization. It can also translate into a concern to be seen, into a social life full of appearances, meetings, dinners and receptions. It can also lead to a business mentality, caught up with management, statistics, plans and evaluations whose principal beneficiary is not God’s people but the Church as an institution. (95).

Elitist generals vs. soldiers in the trenches

…the vainglory of those who are content to have a modicum of power and would rather be the general of a defeated army than a mere private in a unit which continues to fight. How often we dream up vast apostolic projects, meticulously planned, just like defeated generals!

Volunteers serve people during free dinner provided by Chicago Catholic Charities

Volunteers serving dinner provided Nov. 1, 2013 by the Emergency Assistance Department of Chicago Catholic Charities. (CNS photo/Jim Young, Reuters)

But this is to deny our history as a Church, which is glorious precisely because it is a history of sacrifice, of hopes and daily struggles, of lives spent in service and fidelity to work, tiring as it may be, for all work is “the sweat of our brow”. … We indulge in endless fantasies and we lose contact with the real lives and difficulties of our people. (96).

Stop fighting. Be nice

Beware of the temptation of jealousy! We are all in the same boat and headed to the same port! Let us ask for the grace to rejoice in the gifts of each, which belong to all. (99).

To pray for a person with whom I am irritated is a beautiful step forward in love, and an act of evangelization. Let us do it today! Let us not allow ourselves to be robbed of the ideal of fraternal love! (101).

Don’t leave home without it

Being a disciple means being constantly ready to bring the love of Jesus to others, and this can happen unexpectedly and in any place: on the street, in a city square, during work, on a journey. (127).

Faith becomes charity

Catholic parishioners distributing groceries to those in need in Prattsburgh, N.Y. (CNS file photo/Mike Crupi, Catholic Courier)

The Gospel is not merely about our personal relationship with God. Nor should our loving response to God be seen simply as an accumulation of small personal gestures to individuals in need, a kind of “charity à la carte”, or a series of acts aimed solely at easing our conscience. (180).

An authentic faith – which is never comfortable or completely personal – always involves a deep desire to change the world, to transmit values, to leave this earth somehow better that we found it. We love this magnificent planet on which God has put us, and we love the human family which dwells here, with all its tragedies and struggles. (183).

There’s only so much one man can do…

How I long to find the right words to stir up enthusiasm for a new chapter of evangelization full of fervor, joy, generosity, courage, boundless love and attraction! Yet I realize that no words of encouragement will be enough unless the fire of the Holy Spirit burns in our hearts. (261).

Jesus is here to help

Pope Francis prays during Good Friday Way of the Cross at Colosseum

Pope Francis praying during the Good Friday Way of the Cross at the Colosseum in Rome March 29. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

We need to implore his grace daily, asking him to open our cold hearts and shake up our lukewarm and superficial existence. … How good it is to stand before a crucifix, or on our knees before the Blessed Sacrament, and simply to be in his presence! How much good it does us when he once more touches our lives and impels us to share his new life! (264).

Mission Possible

My mission of being in the heart of the people is not just a part of my life or a badge I can take off; it is not an “extra” or just another moment in life. Instead, it is something I cannot uproot from my being without destroying my very self. I am a mission on this earth; that is the reason why I am here in this world. (273).

No such thing as the ‘good ole days’

Some people nowadays console themselves by saying that things are not as easy as they used to be, yet we know that the Roman empire was not conducive to the Gospel message, the struggle for justice, or the defense of human dignity. … Let us not say, then, that things are harder today; they are simply different. But let us learn also from the saints who have gone before us, who confronted the difficulties of their own day. So I propose that we pause to rediscover some of the reasons which can help us to imitate them today. (263).

There will always be light from darkness

Worshipers holding candles during the Easter Vigil at St. Jude Church in Mastic Beach, N.Y. in 2013. (CNS file photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)

However dark things are, goodness always re-emerges and spreads. Each day in our world beauty is born anew, it rises transformed through the storms of history. Values always tend to reappear under new guises, and human beings have arisen time after time from situations that seemed doomed. Such is the power of the resurrection, and all who evangelize are instruments of that  power. (276).

Mary

Jesus left us his mother to be our mother. …

DEPICTION OF MARY HOLDING BODY OF CRUCIFIED CHRIST

Mary holding the body of her crucified son, Jesus, in this mural at Holy Family Church in the West Bank town of Ramallah. (CNS photo/Debbie Hill)

He brought us to her because he did not want us to journey without a mother, and our people read in this maternal image all the mysteries of the Gospel. The Lord did not want to leave the Church without this icon of womanhood. Mary, who brought him into the world with great faith, also accompanies “the rest of her offspring, those who keep the commandments of God and bear testimony to Jesus” (Rev 12:17). (285).

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 758 other followers