No knocking at the cathedral door

The sanctuary of the Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul in Philadelphia is seen from the down its main aisle. (CNS/Nancy Wiechec)

The sanctuary of the Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul in Philadelphia is seen from down its main aisle. (CNS/Nancy Wiechec)

PHILADELPHIA — There will be no knocking on the door when Archbishop Charles J. Chaput arrives to the Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul in Philadelphia on the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

The custom of knocking on the cathedral door, which has been done by some U.S. bishops when they were received at a new diocese, is not a practice that the church prescribes for such a ceremony.

What is called for in the church’s “Ceremonial of Bishops” is being followed closely for the reception of Archbishop Chaput, formerly of Denver, to Philadelphia.
According to Father Dennis Gill, director of worship for the archdiocese, here’s how the Sept. 8 service will go down.

Archbishop Chaput, accompanied by Cardinal Justin Rigali, will be received at the door of the cathedral by the rector, Msgr. Arthur E. Rogers, who will present a crucifix and holy water. The archbishop will kiss the crucifix and sprinkle himself and those present with holy water.

They process into the cathedral and after kissing the altar, Cardinal Rigali takes his place at the cathedra and Archbishop Chaput takes a seat across the sanctuary next to the ambo.

The apostolic letter announcing the appointment of Archbishop Chaput to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is presented and read.

Cardinal Rigali crosses the sanctuary and escorts Archbishop Chaput to the cathedra, the seat of the bishop.

The new archbishop is greeted by representatives of the local church; first by auxiliary bishops, then by clergy, women religious and lay people and lastly by civic officials and representatives of other faiths.

From this point, the Mass continues.

Archbishop Chaput has decided to give his first homily as archbishop of Philadelphia from the cathedra rather than from the ambo, according to Father Gill.

In giving media the rundown on the ceremony yesterday, the priest also mentioned that Archbishop Chaput had two special song requests for the installation service: “Gift of Finest Wheat” and “O God Beyond All Praising.” Both hymns are being included in the Mass.

6 Responses

  1. [quote]had two special song requests for the installation service: “Gift of Finest Wheat” and “O God Beyond All Praising.” Both hymns are being included in the Mass.[/quote]

    They should always be referred to as Hymns rather than songs.

  2. Actually, a hymn does not have a refrain that repeats after every stanza. That makes ‘Gift of Finest Wheat’ a song. Hymns and songs are different things. Hymns are allowed in the liturgy, songs, well…

  3. I do love the fact that he’s following the “Ceremonial of Bishops” closely instead of the local customs. I wonder what that says about what he will be like as Archbishop.

  4. where exactly or how important is tradition either local or international?

  5. Who cares as long as Rigali is gone!

  6. Songs? How innovative of the CNS!

    When a “Catholic” medium writes a story about Solis yet never mentions her support of abortion, partial-birth abortion, embryonic stem cell research, and U.S. pro-funding for ‘family planning’ services abroad there’s a problem. Perhaps this organization should rename itself Anglican/Episcopalian? I’ll be writing to the Bishops suggesting this idea. Our local Catholic News didn’t pick up your story but many did, this is a huge scandal because you’re telling everyone it’s okay to support the culture of death, if one is a politician.

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