Holy Land journey: We arrive in Jerusalem

By Bishop Gerald Kicanas
One in a series

DAY FIVE: Jan. 9, 2010

JERUSALEM — Steve Colecchi of the U.S. bishops’ conference, Bill O’Keefe of Catholic Relief Services and I left Beirut early to fly to Amman, Jordan, and then from Amman to Tel Aviv. It is complicated because Lebanon does not have relationship with Israel so you cannot fly direct. When we entered Lebanon, each person’s passport is checked for an Israeli stamp which could be at least somewhat problematic. For that reason we had to have two passports in order to travel to Lebanon and then to Israel.

With all the complications, our transit went very smoothly. After long security lines and careful screening, our two flights got us to Tel Aviv, where a CRS driver met us to bring us by car to Jerusalem, about one half hour from Tel Aviv. (continue below)

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(Editor’s Note: Bishop Gerald Kicanas of Tucson, Ariz., vice president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, is on a trip to Lebanon, Israel and the Palestinian territories to attend an international meeting of  bishops in support of the church in the Holy Land. He has agreed to be a guest blogger for us during the trip.)

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I am always amazed at how much development takes place in Jerusalem from year to year. The countryside on the road up to Jerusalem is marked by more and more major developments. When we arrived in the Holy City we went to the Knights Palace, the pilgrim residence for the Latin Patriarchate, where we will be staying for the week.

We quickly settled in and Bill and I went for a run around Jerusalem. There is always so much to see as one moves from the Arab center in East Jerusalem to the Hasidic Jewish section of Mea Shearim to the developments in West Jerusalem. Being Shabbat, there was little traffic. Many Jews travel to the Wailing Wall on Saturdays and it is a time for prayer and rest. It was good to see so many families walking together or gathering for prayer. This happens, of course, in Arab communities on Fridays for Muslims and on Sundays for Christians. We worship one God. We pray. If only we could be one in peace.

Franciscan Father Garret Edmunds leads a tour group around the Dome of the Rock in the Old City of Jerusalem in this photo from last year. (CNS/Debbie Hill)

Jerusalem draws you in by its history, fascinates you with its many sounds, overwhelms you with its diversity. As I wander through the Old City one cannot help but think how much and how little has changed in the generations who have called Jerusalem home. As a city sacred to three faiths, it is a place of pilgrimage that regretfully has known little peace. Still today you see armed soldiers and feel the tensions that can erupt instantaneously.

We enjoyed an evening dinner at Notre Dame, a residence directed by the Legionnaires of Christ where many pilgrims stay. They began a restaurant for pilgrims that served delicious food. Some of the staff of the restaurant have been trained in hospitality service at Bethlehem University, a marvelous university run by the De La Salle Christian Brothers on the West Bank in Bethlehem. George, our waiter for the night, was working for his first night. While nervous, he cared for us well.

It was good to see Matt Davis, Director of CRS in this country, along with Elias, a Palestinian who works with CRS, and Ian, who is assistant director in his first year in this area. They updated us on the work of CRS, especially in Gaza since the war last year and helped us figure out plans for our stay this year.

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