Catholic journalist is more than embedded

Neil McCabe, a reporter for The Pilot newspaper in the Archdiocese of Boston, is experiencing the war in Iraq from the inside. But he’s not just embedded as a journalist; he’s a soldier. You can read about what he’s found in Iraq, including the challenge of receiving the sacraments, here.

Don’t stop the presses yet, says columnist

Writing for our friends UCA News in Asia, Maryknoll Father William Grimm writes about the future of Catholic journalism. In an editorial titled “Don’t stop the presses — yet,” Father Grimm writes that the electronic age is upon us, and “every editor’s desk should have on it a picture of a tombstone with the name of his or her publication on it.”

“The demise of the Catholic press is inevitable,” he writes, “but, at least in Asia, it may still be a bit early to make funeral arrangements.”

However, he notes, “the role of Catholic journalism shall remain, even though the mode of delivery will change.” Read the full column here.

Year for Priests: Rome as evangelization machine

By Paulist Father Tom Holahan
One in a series

ROME — The recent announcement that the Vatican will allow Anglicans to continue their “traditional spiritual practices” in the Catholic Church has started people thinking: Catholicism now has a formal way to accommodate a married priesthood for a very specific group of people. What more might unfold? Whatever the long-term outcome, this announcement is a milestone in the Year for Priests.

It’s no coincidence that next year’s beatification of Cardinal John Henry Newman, Gordon Brown’s invitation to the pope to visit Britain and easing the journey to Rome for interested Anglicans have all come about together. Work in many departments of the Vatican has converged, setting the stage for a spectacular new era in ecumenism.

On the far horizon is the speculation that Cardinal Newman could be named a doctor of the church, underscoring his contributions to “development of doctrine” and conscience. Whether Europe is ready or not, plans for its re-evangelization are on track.

Rome, in its way, is a 500-year-old evangelization machine. The buildings and art created as a response to the Protestant critique still call to people who are searching and create a mood of reflection. Just before I arrived in Rome, I met an industrial psychologist who was a Christian but now follows a Native American practice. He told me that, when he went to the Vatican, sunbeams from the dome of the church hit Michelangelo’s Pieta and brought tears to his eyes.

A week ago I heard from two nuns, dressed in habits, who were stopped on the street by a Japanese tourist. She wanted to know, could they possibly spare a few moments to explain Christianity to her? Yesterday a Syrian found his way to our English-speaking church (he knew no Italian) asking the same question. He told me he had no particular faith, but he had been impressed with the Syrian Orthodox while in his own country and now, before he had to leave the country because of a document problem, he wanted to find out more. He asked his questions urgently, “And, so, Jesus was the Son of God?” “He promised eternal life?” Searching Americans approach the faith issue differently. One recently told me he “gave up on God” when the Supreme Being did not cure his depression and taking a little pill did. I said there may come a time when something can’t be fixed, then what?

Rome Diary

Oct 3 – A wedding in a secret chapel of the Pantheon brings me within range of the seventh-century icon that is preserved there. The dark, rough plank has the serene Mary holding, with both hands, a child who looks out upon the world with wonder and apprehension. Later icon painters would have to follow strict rules on portrayal but here the artist was free to express exactly what came from his heart. The image has survived so much danger and destruction — what better image to have before two people ready to put their lives in each others’ care? When emperor Phocas agreed to give the church ownership of the Pantheon (609) it was a way both of saving the most complete remnant of the Roman Empire and also a dramatic statement of Christian triumph – the building formerly dedicated to the gods would now be dedicated to Mary and the Christian martyrs. As I leave, the sacristan reminds me it is the 1,400th anniversary of the Pantheon as a church and the pope has offered a plenary indulgence to all who attend Mass here during the month of October. The building is so old and well-loved, this seems the perfect anniversary gift – complete forgiveness of punishment for past sins.

Oct. 3 – Today at school the second grade is learning about the Eucharist. Some of them are, that is. The Muslim children are out of the room at another activity, except for one boy who carefully explains to me that he does not have to answer any of my questions because he is Muslim. My lesson is based on a picture of the sanctuary. I point to something and ask the class what it is. I go through one or two things and on my third question the Muslim boy can stand it no longer. “That’s the tabernacle!” he declares. And he is right.

Fresco (detail) of Santa Susanna

Fresco (detail) of Santa Susanna

Oct 8 — It’s been almost a year since a group of pilgrims from Sardinia visited the Church of Santa Susanna. This devotion goes back to the time when slaves of Susanna’s household fled to Sardinia to find a new life as workers in the island’s silver and salt mines. Today a group arrives from Torre Santa Susanna (near modern Brindisi), the town where the freedmen and guards of the same household took refuge 1,700 years ago. Sometimes, young Susanna seems an insignificant saint among the city’s so many other accomplished luminaries. These pilgrims bring me back to the fervor of unwavering devotion as I recall that our Sardinian visitors had even sung a hymn to Santa Susanna handed down to them over the centuries.

Father Thomas J. Holahan, CSP, was ordained for the Paulist Fathers in 1977. Since 2006 he has served as vice-rector at the Church of Santa Susanna in Rome. This church was designated for Americans in Rome by the Vatican in 1922. He is also chaplain to Marymount International School. Previously, he has worked in campus ministry at the University of Colorado (Boulder), the University of California (Berkeley) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has also served as communications director for the dioceses of Austin, Texas, and Columbus, Ohio.

Click here for more in this series.

Remembering the murder of a Polish priest

A section of McCarren Park in Brooklyn, N.Y.,  is named for the late Father Jerzy Popieluszko, a popular priest who was outspoken in his support for the Solidarity movement in Poland and who was abducted and murdered by government agents in 1984. To commemorate the 25th anniversary of his death, a special ceremony was held at the park Oct. 19 and attended by, among others, members of the Polish American Congress.

Photo courtesy of Polish American Congress

Photo courtesy of Polish American Congress

The ceremony followed Mass celebrated at St. Stanislaus Kostka Church in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn by Father Marek Sobczak, pastor, who also led a prayer service at Father Popieluszko Square in the park. Each year there is a service to remember the death of the priest, who is memorialized in a bust in the park.

The Polish American Congress had a major role in getting the city of New York to agree to name a section of the park for the priest. It was dedicated by then-Mayor Edward Koch in 1986.

During the years the Solidarity movement rose to fight communism in Poland, Pope John Paul II told his countrymen, “Do not be afraid.” And as the Polish American Congress noted, “Father Popieluszko conveyed the pope’s words of guidance and encouragement to his Polish parishioners every month” during his popular “Masses for the homeland.”

In 1990 the Warsaw Archdiocese approved an official prayer for the late priest’s canonization and raised his church, also named St. Stanislaus Kostka, to the status of a national shrine. Father Popieluszko is buried there.

Cardinal Kasper on special arrangement for former Anglicans

VATICAN CITY — Presenting a book last week on the results of 40 years of dialogue with Anglicans, Lutherans, Methodists and members of the Reformed churches, the Vatican’s chief ecumenist was asked about rumors that special provisions would be made for Anglicans wanting to enter into full communion with the Catholic Church. The special provision was announced today.

Cardinal Walter Kasper

Cardinal Walter Kasper (CNS/Paul Haring)

Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, told reporters at the book presentation, “We are not fishing in the Anglican lake; proselytism is not the policy of the Catholic Church.

“But if there are people who obeying their consciences want to become Catholic, we cannot shut the door,” he said.

The movement of Anglicans to the Catholic Church is not new. And it’s not unheard of for Catholics to join the Anglican Communion.

Cardinal Kasper said, “I think there is an agreement between us and the (Anglican) Archbishop of Canterbury that we have to respect their freedom of conscience and freedom of religion.”

At the same time, he said, “we want to continue our dialogue with the Anglican Communion and there is no change in our policy, we go on in our dialogue and in November we will have our meeting” with Anglican representatives aimed at starting a new round of dialogue by the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission.

The question of Anglicans joining the Catholic Church is not a matter dealt with directly by the Christian unity council, but by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. A Catholic who wants to become an Anglican or an Anglican who wants to become a Catholic is dealing with “a matter of conscience, a question of faith that must be respected by all partners,” Cardinal Kasper said.

“Nevertheless ecumenical dialogue is not aimed at making proselytism, that is a personal decision for everybody and it’s a work of the Holy Spirit we cannot interfere with.”

Text of Vatican note on new structure for Anglicans entering Catholic Church

VATICAN CITY — The following is the “Note of The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith about Personal Ordinariates for Anglicans Entering the Catholic Church,” published by the Vatican today:

With the preparation of an Apostolic Constitution, the Catholic Church is responding to the many requests that have been submitted to the Holy See from groups of Anglican clergy and faithful in different parts of the world who wish to enter into full visible communion.

In this Apostolic Constitution the Holy Father has introduced a canonical structure that provides for such corporate reunion by establishing Personal Ordinariates, which will allow former Anglicans to enter full communion with the Catholic Church while preserving elements of the distinctive Anglican spiritual and liturgical patrimony. Under the terms of the Apostolic Constitution, pastoral oversight and guidance will be provided for groups of former Anglicans through a Personal Ordinariate, whose Ordinary will usually be appointed from among former Anglican clergy.

The forthcoming Apostolic Constitution provides a reasonable and even necessary response to a world-wide phenomenon, by offering a single canonical model for the universal Church which is adaptable to various local situations and equitable to former Anglicans in its universal application. It provides for the ordination as Catholic priests of married former Anglican clergy. Historical and ecumenical reasons preclude the ordination of married men as bishops in both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. The Constitution therefore stipulates that the Ordinary can be either a priest or an unmarried bishop. The seminarians in the Ordinariate are to be prepared alongside other Catholic seminarians, though the Ordinariate may establish a house of formation to address the particular needs of formation in the Anglican patrimony. In this way, the Apostolic Constitution seeks to balance on the one hand the concern to preserve the worthy Anglican liturgical and spiritual patrimony and, on the other hand, the concern that these groups and their clergy will be integrated into the Catholic Church.

Cardinal William Levada, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith which has prepared this provision, said: “We have been trying to meet the requests for full communion that have come to us from Anglicans in different parts of the world in recent years in a uniform and equitable way. With this proposal the Church wants to respond to the legitimate aspirations of these Anglican groups for full and visible unity with the Bishop of Rome, successor of St. Peter.”

These Personal Ordinariates will be formed, as needed, in consultation with local Conferences of Bishops, and their structure will be similar in some ways to that of the Military Ordinariates which have been established in most countries to provide pastoral care for the members of the armed forces and their dependents throughout the world. “Those Anglicans who have approached the Holy See have made clear their desire for full, visible unity in the one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church. At the same time, they have told us of the importance of their Anglican traditions of spirituality and worship for their faith journey,” Cardinal Levada said.

The provision of this new structure is consistent with the commitment to ecumenical dialogue, which continues to be a priority for the Catholic Church, particularly through the efforts of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity. “The initiative has come from a number of different groups of Anglicans,” Cardinal Levada went on to say: “They have declared that they share the common Catholic faith as it is expressed in the Catechism of the Catholic Church and accept the Petrine ministry as something Christ willed for the Church. For them, the time has come to express this implicit unity in the visible form of full communion.”

According to Levada: “It is the hope of the Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, that the Anglican clergy and faithful who desire union with the Catholic Church will find in this canonical structure the opportunity to preserve those Anglican traditions precious to them and consistent with the Catholic faith. Insofar as these traditions express in a distinctive way the faith that is held in common, they are a gift to be shared in the wider Church. The unity of the Church does not require a uniformity that ignores cultural diversity, as the history of Christianity shows. Moreover, the many diverse traditions present in the Catholic Church today are all rooted in the principle articulated by St. Paul in his letter to the Ephesians: ‘There is one Lord, one faith, one baptism’ (4:5). Our communion is therefore strengthened by such legitimate diversity, and so we are happy that these men and women bring with them their particular contributions to our common life of faith.”

Background information

Since the sixteenth century, when King Henry VIII declared the Church in England independent of Papal Authority, the Church of England has created its own doctrinal confessions, liturgical books, and pastoral practices, often incorporating ideas from the Reformation on the European continent. The expansion of the British Empire, together with Anglican missionary work, eventually gave rise to a world-wide Anglican Communion.

Throughout the more than 450 years of its history the question of the reunification of Anglicans and Catholics has never been far from mind. In the mid-nineteenth century the Oxford Movement (in England) saw a rekindling of interest in the Catholic aspects of Anglicanism. In the early twentieth century Cardinal Mercier of Belgium entered into well publicized conversations with Anglicans to explore the possibility of union with the Catholic Church under the banner of an Anglicanism “reunited but not absorbed”.

At the Second Vatican Council hope for union was further nourished when the Decree on Ecumenism (n. 13), referring to communions separated from the Catholic Church at the time of the Reformation, stated that: “Among those in which Catholic traditions and institutions in part continue to exist, the Anglican Communion occupies a special place.”

Since the Council, Anglican-Roman Catholic relations have created a much improved climate of mutual understanding and cooperation. The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) produced a series of doctrinal statements over the years in the hope of creating the basis for full and visible unity. For many in both communions, the ARCIC statements provided a vehicle in which a common expression of faith could be recognized. It is in this framework that this new provision should be seen.

In the years since the Council, some Anglicans have abandoned the tradition of conferring Holy Orders only on men by calling women to the priesthood and the episcopacy. More recently, some segments of the Anglican Communion have departed from the common biblical teaching on human sexuality—already clearly stated in the ARCIC document “Life in Christ”—by the ordination of openly homosexual clergy and the blessing of homosexual partnerships. At the same time, as the Anglican Communion faces these new and difficult challenges, the Catholic Church remains fully committed to continuing ecumenical engagement with the Anglican Communion, particularly through the efforts of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity.

In the meantime, many individual Anglicans have entered into full communion with the Catholic Church. Sometimes there have been groups of Anglicans who have entered while preserving some “corporate” structure. Examples of this include, the Anglican diocese of Amritsar in India, and some individual parishes in the United States which maintained an Anglican identity when entering the Catholic Church under a “pastoral provision” adopted by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and approved by Pope John Paul II in 1982. In these cases, the Catholic Church has frequently dispensed from the requirement of celibacy to allow those married Anglican clergy who desire to continue ministerial service as Catholic priests to be ordained in the Catholic Church.

In the light of these developments, the Personal Ordinariates established by the Apostolic Constitution can be seen as another step toward the realization the aspiration for full, visible union in the Church of Christ, one of the principal goals of the ecumenical movement.

Vatican announces new structure for Anglicans joining Catholic Church

(UPDATE: More complete story here.)

VATICAN CITY — Pope Benedict XVI has established a special structure for Anglicans who want to be in full communion with Roman Catholic Church while preserving aspects of their Anglican spiritual and liturgical heritage, said U.S. Cardinal William J. Levada.

CARDINAL LEVADA SPEAKS AT 2007 VATICAN PRESS CONFERENCE

Cardinal Levada at a 2007 Vatican press conference. (CNS/CPP)

The cardinal, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, said a new apostolic constitution would establish “personal ordinariates” — similar to dioceses– to oversee the pastoral care of those who want to bring elements of their Anglican identity into the Catholic Church with them.

Anglican priests who are married will be ordained Catholic priests, although married Anglican bishops will not be able to function as Catholic bishops in keeping with the longstanding Catholic and Orthodox tradition of ordaining only unmarried clergy as bishops, Cardinal Levada said.

The cardinal announced the new arrangement during a press conference today at the Vatican. He said the pope’s apostolic constitution and norms for implementing were undergoing final revisions and would be published in a couple of weeks.

The new provision does not weaken the commitment of the Vatican to promoting Christian unity, Cardinal Levada said, but is a further recognition that many Anglicans share the Catholic faith and that Anglicans have a spiritual and liturgical life worth preserving.

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