Oblate Father Carl Kabat: ‘A fool for Christ’

Oblate Father Carl Kabat, 76, prepares to hang a banner on the fence around a nuclear armed missile in northern Colorado Aug. 6. (Courtesy St. Louis Catholic Worker)

Oblate Father Carl Kabat, 76, prepares to hang a banner on the fence around a nuclear armed missile in northern Colorado Aug. 6. (Courtesy St. Louis Catholic Worker)

Spending time behind bars is nothing new for Oblate Father Carl Kabat. So on his 76th birthday Oct. 10, he could think of no better place to be than a jail cell.

The St. Louis priest has spent more than 15 years behind bars as a “fool for Christ” for numerous faith witnesses challenging U.S. nuclear weapons policy.

Father Kabat’s latest arrest came Aug. 6. Dressed in his usual colorful clown suit, he cut a hole in a fence surrounding a missile silo in rural Weld County, 40 miles north of Greeley, Colo. The fence was decorated with banners decrying the pursuit of nuclear warfare and a clown doll.

His symbolic action came on the anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan. The statement he issued prior to his arrest can be read here.

Father Kabat spent his 76th birthday in the Weld County Jail, where he is awaiting trial on misdemeanor charges of trespassing and criminal mischief for his latest protest. His trial is set for Dec. 9.

When he’s not engaged in faith-based protests, Father Kabat resides at Karen House, a Catholic Worker house for homeless women and their children, in St. Louis. Ordained 50 years ago, he was a missionary in the Philippines and Brazil in the 1960s and 1970s.

Father Kabat can be reached at the Weld County Jail, 2110 O St., Greeley, Colo., 80631.

St. Damien’s ceaseless care for the suffering inspires

Joining in the celebration of the Oct. 11 canonization of  St. Damien de Veuster is Council 11411 of the Knights of Columbus in the Diocese of Rochester, N.Y.  The Blessed Damien of Molokai Council is among a handful of Knights’ councils across the country named after the Belgian-born missionary priest who ministered in Hawaii, caring for those who had leprosy, or Hansen’s disease as it is called today.

“Basically, our mission is to reflect Christ as a servant. Damien reflected that very well,” Angelo Guzman, warden of Council 11411, said in an interview in the Catholic Courier, Rochester’s diocesan newspaper. “To be the right arm of the church — this is what Damien did. He wasn’t afraid to to get his hands dirty, and neither are we.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 733 other followers